Lasting Power: How Moving Mountains’ “Final” Record Still Remains One Of The Best, Even Over A Year Later

It’s quite rare to sit down with a record and be totally engulfed in it - as if you’re listening to it for the first time - when in reality, it came out over a year ago. This kind of lasting power is so rare, in fact, that most people don’t really get to experience this bizarre yet comfortable feeling. With Moving Mountains' self-titled LP from September 2013, it's extremely difficult not to feel precisely this way.
Releasing the album after putting out a black and white live video series (the “Telegraph Sessions”) of the band performing each song on YouTube, Moving Mountains soon thereafter announced their hiatus as a band before the world really got to settle into the record. The worst part? Moving Mountains is easily their most mature, focused, and well-rounded effort to date. After a few phenomenal EP’s and a couple LP’s, Moving Mountains sat back and refined their sound in such a way that it seemingly signaled a return to form and a move towards possible ubiquity within the music scene. The head-scratching decision to take a hiatus after barely touring (if at all) in support of the incredible new LP left many wondering.. “Why?” Luckily, even with this heartbreaking decision, Moving Mountains have left us with an incredible record that apparently does not recognize time or age, as it has held up perfectly to 2014’s grueling standards.
I wrote plenty of words about the album and what it meant to me at the time of release, but a year later, I oddly feel exactly the same way. How can this be? Music changes so rapidly, and the amount of new bands and records grow by the day. How can one album be so ignorant of time and its inevitable effect on its music? Honestly, I don’t know the answer. I wish I did. I feel like there just isn’t anything else out there that hits on the same level as this record right now, save for maybe Prawn’s phenomenal new record - which I wrote at length about over here - Kingfisher. This is partly true because Greg Dunn (Moving Mountains’ lead singer, songwriter, and guitarist) recorded and produced the album for Prawn, and even made a guest appearance on a song. But, past that, there’s not much else that’s anything close to Moving Mountains. 
When Waves came out in 2011, it saw the band taking a much different direction that what we saw and heard on Pneuma and Foreword. Waves sent the band into Thrice-ish territory, what with the phenomenal air-y guitars and angsty vocals. It was a progression - natural, for most bands - from the tracks on Foreword and a complete rethinking of what the band was and who they wanted to be during Pneuma. To be fair, the band - Dunn, specifically - has stated in interviews that he was young during the recording of Pneuma and things had changed significantly since then. But, it was Waves that showcased the band’s true, raw talent and made them a driving force in the scene. Waves contained so many great tracks and wove an incredible story in such an unexpected way that it helped catapult the album to many people’s top end-of-year lists, including mine. This breakthrough record really set the stage for Moving Mountains in so many ways.
When I first sat down to write about Moving Mountains, I couldn’t shake the chills I got from listening to “Apsides” or the end of “Eastern Leaves”. I don’t get too many chills from music these days, but every time I heard those two tracks, I felt that way. It was hard to explain. It still is. At the end of my piece on the record and how it was necessary to listen to, I placed a great quote from Dunn which the band still currently has in its biography. Let me put it here again, too:

"We’re thinking in terms of 20 years from now," Dunn boasts ambitiously. "If someone goes back and they’re like, ‘Remember Moving Mountains?’ We want them to remember this album."

It’s pretty eerie how relevant that quote is. Sure, it’s only been just over a year since this record, but it holds true to an even greater effect. Obviously, Dunn needs to use hyperbole to get the message across by exaggerating the time scheme to 20 years instead of just a few, but the point is well taken. Moving Mountains has transcended its own self and yet somehow managed to stay relevant in the process. It’s a phenomena that is impossible to pin down on just one thing, and even more difficult to fully explain.
What I will say, though, is this album is special. Like the many before it - and the many that have subsequently come after it - Moving Mountains does so many things right in such a short time. One great example is of the haunting piano line during “Apsides”. It is so simple and yet provides such a perfect layer to the song that it’s kind of hard to comprehend. The lyrics themselves are even more eerie now that the band is on hiatus. In the first half of “Apsides”, Dunn croons ever-so-subtely:
Will it sell?And will the kids define it as something that breaks the ground,and all the things that don’t amount to anything at all?
This is a huge departure from the subject matter of the rest of the song, but you can’t help but believe that this is Dunn in his most honest, most stream-of-consciousness sort of construction. The record obviously didn’t “sell”, as most records these days ever eclipse the top 50 of the Billboard top 200. It obviously didn’t “break the ground” to most “kids”, but to those of us who can read between the lines and appreciate the haunting-yet-comforting elements of the record, it definitely broke the ground. The ground - to this day, a year later - remains destroyed and in need of repairs.
But, at this point, I’m not so sure we want to repair the marks that Moving Mountains have left on our world. Thank you Greg Dunn and the rest of Moving Mountains for a record that truly none of us saw coming. We continue to be impressed… even a year after the fact.

Lasting Power: How Moving Mountains’ “Final” Record Still Remains One Of The Best, Even Over A Year Later

It’s quite rare to sit down with a record and be totally engulfed in it - as if you’re listening to it for the first time - when in reality, it came out over a year ago. This kind of lasting power is so rare, in fact, that most people don’t really get to experience this bizarre yet comfortable feeling. With Moving Mountains' self-titled LP from September 2013, it's extremely difficult not to feel precisely this way.

Releasing the album after putting out a black and white live video series (the “Telegraph Sessions”) of the band performing each song on YouTube, Moving Mountains soon thereafter announced their hiatus as a band before the world really got to settle into the record. The worst part? Moving Mountains is easily their most mature, focused, and well-rounded effort to date. After a few phenomenal EP’s and a couple LP’s, Moving Mountains sat back and refined their sound in such a way that it seemingly signaled a return to form and a move towards possible ubiquity within the music scene. The head-scratching decision to take a hiatus after barely touring (if at all) in support of the incredible new LP left many wondering.. “Why?” Luckily, even with this heartbreaking decision, Moving Mountains have left us with an incredible record that apparently does not recognize time or age, as it has held up perfectly to 2014’s grueling standards.

I wrote plenty of words about the album and what it meant to me at the time of release, but a year later, I oddly feel exactly the same way. How can this be? Music changes so rapidly, and the amount of new bands and records grow by the day. How can one album be so ignorant of time and its inevitable effect on its music? Honestly, I don’t know the answer. I wish I did. I feel like there just isn’t anything else out there that hits on the same level as this record right now, save for maybe Prawn’s phenomenal new record - which I wrote at length about over here - Kingfisher. This is partly true because Greg Dunn (Moving Mountains’ lead singer, songwriter, and guitarist) recorded and produced the album for Prawn, and even made a guest appearance on a song. But, past that, there’s not much else that’s anything close to Moving Mountains.

When Waves came out in 2011, it saw the band taking a much different direction that what we saw and heard on Pneuma and Foreword. Waves sent the band into Thrice-ish territory, what with the phenomenal air-y guitars and angsty vocals. It was a progression - natural, for most bands - from the tracks on Foreword and a complete rethinking of what the band was and who they wanted to be during Pneuma. To be fair, the band - Dunn, specifically - has stated in interviews that he was young during the recording of Pneuma and things had changed significantly since then. But, it was Waves that showcased the band’s true, raw talent and made them a driving force in the scene. Waves contained so many great tracks and wove an incredible story in such an unexpected way that it helped catapult the album to many people’s top end-of-year lists, including mine. This breakthrough record really set the stage for Moving Mountains in so many ways.

When I first sat down to write about Moving Mountains, I couldn’t shake the chills I got from listening to “Apsides” or the end of “Eastern Leaves”. I don’t get too many chills from music these days, but every time I heard those two tracks, I felt that way. It was hard to explain. It still is. At the end of my piece on the record and how it was necessary to listen to, I placed a great quote from Dunn which the band still currently has in its biography. Let me put it here again, too:

"We’re thinking in terms of 20 years from now," Dunn boasts ambitiously. "If someone goes back and they’re like, ‘Remember Moving Mountains?’ We want them to remember this album."

It’s pretty eerie how relevant that quote is. Sure, it’s only been just over a year since this record, but it holds true to an even greater effect. Obviously, Dunn needs to use hyperbole to get the message across by exaggerating the time scheme to 20 years instead of just a few, but the point is well taken. Moving Mountains has transcended its own self and yet somehow managed to stay relevant in the process. It’s a phenomena that is impossible to pin down on just one thing, and even more difficult to fully explain.

What I will say, though, is this album is special. Like the many before it - and the many that have subsequently come after it - Moving Mountains does so many things right in such a short time. One great example is of the haunting piano line during “Apsides”. It is so simple and yet provides such a perfect layer to the song that it’s kind of hard to comprehend. The lyrics themselves are even more eerie now that the band is on hiatus. In the first half of “Apsides”, Dunn croons ever-so-subtely:

Will it sell?
And will the kids define it
as something that breaks the ground,
and all the things that don’t amount
to anything at all?

This is a huge departure from the subject matter of the rest of the song, but you can’t help but believe that this is Dunn in his most honest, most stream-of-consciousness sort of construction. The record obviously didn’t “sell”, as most records these days ever eclipse the top 50 of the Billboard top 200. It obviously didn’t “break the ground” to most “kids”, but to those of us who can read between the lines and appreciate the haunting-yet-comforting elements of the record, it definitely broke the ground. The ground - to this day, a year later - remains destroyed and in need of repairs.

But, at this point, I’m not so sure we want to repair the marks that Moving Mountains have left on our world. Thank you Greg Dunn and the rest of Moving Mountains for a record that truly none of us saw coming. We continue to be impressed… even a year after the fact.

"Aspirational" by Matthew Frost (for Vs. Magazine)

This is a pretty important short film, and it’s only 2 and a half minutes. So, watch it.

Yeah, I know there has been countless videos done about this kind of thing, but I like the way Frost really captured the selfishness of the two fangirl characters. It’s not about the celebrity/artist anymore, it’s about them

Just another reminder to be yourself, and act appropriately in public. And no matter how “famous” somebody is, they are still human beings. They’re no different from us.

Anonymous asked:

If you could play in any band, what would it be?

Fantastic question.

As an avid music fan, it’s a tough decision. I love so many bands, but to actually get the opportunity to play in one of them and hope you don’t ruin what they already had… that’s a bigger issue.

But, with all that aside, I’d probably want to play in Converge the most. Kurt Ballou was the biggest influence on me back when I was playing guitar in a band, and to play alongside him would not only be fantastic, it would also be the world’s greatest learning experience. He has so much knowledge about guitar, guitar tone, and amplification, that’d it be just simply an awesome experience.

Anonymous asked:

people/ex's who changed your life?

I think it’s safe to say anyone who you were romantically involved with at some point has changed your life in one way or another. The longer the relationship, the more impact they will have on you in the long run.

For people that have changed my life, I would probably say my Dad. Cliche, I know… but not for the reasons you’d expect. We didn’t get along very well in the last years of his life, but when I was growing up, he taught me the power of music and championed computers and video games for me. The latter two things have had a huge impact on me, but nothing like how the former has. Music - again, a cliche - has changed the way I think, act, and live. Playing guitar was a huge diversion in my life and moved me from one trajectory to another. My Dad and Mom were the two people who bought me my first guitar, a red Squier Stratocaster. From then on, I knew that I would always be playing guitar.

And, of course, reflecting on who changed your life and who has helped you along the way is a powerful thing. Everyone should do a little more of that.

brokenworldmedia

thedandiestlandscape:

Curly Hair // Brightside

Wait. Are we doing the wrong or right thing? 

Seafoam eyes, pale white like the moon 
Jupiter and Saturn sing a different kind of tune 
bordering July but you were born in June 

Stones weigh worlds where twins surf mid air 
horn crowned children tend to be unfair 

Wait. Are we doing the wrong or right thing? 

Tell me I was wrong. Get it off your chest. 
a psychic premonition. Falling off was for the best 
but you would never be the one to put it all the rest. 

Give me time. Just let me stir my head. 
I’ve got goals that you don’t get. 

Sleep is harder than it seems, alone under the sheets. 
its only for a week.

Anonymous asked:

Where do you see yourself in ten years?

I think a lot of people answer that question too realistically. For me, I’d like to think that in ten years I’ll be in my “ideal situation”. What is that? I’m not even sure.

I made the oft-maligned decision earlier this year to pursue my education past my BA and pursue my MA. Where will that get me? Who knows. There’s no way to tell, but if I had it my way, I’d be teaching ESL or Linguistics at a community college in California and keeping up on my hobbies.

But, well, it’s hard to say. I can tell you that when I was younger, I probably imagined myself at 37 in a nice house somewhere, working in software development and finding hobbies to keep up in. That obviously isn’t going to pan out. And that’s okay.

Your late twenties are a huge transition period, and to make the most of it is easy to decide but even harder to execute on. So far, I’d like to be honest with myself and admit that I’m especially behind the curve but I’m working diligently to return to form. What that ‘form’ actually *is* seems to be another question altogether.

So come to terms with what you can 
because it’s gone before you know it 
my life is not a party 
It’s sort of like an omen 

I bought some merch from the wonderful Broken World Media and because the shipment was unexpectedly delayed, they made everything right with the free vinyl from Brightside. I had no idea who they were before seeing it in the package, but now, I am a massive fan. Phenomenal record that is an odd fusion between early TWIABP, Minus the Bear, and other BWM bands.

You can listen to it and download it for free (!!!) at BWM’s awesome Bandcamp page.

Anonymous asked:

Are you still friends with your band mates?

Yeah! JP is one of my close friends and I just recently got in touch with the original founder of Capistrano, Travis. Not sure where our drummer Jeff is, nobody seems to have any idea about that.

It’s good to keep relationships and try to stay in touch, even as you and your friends start to take completely different paths in life. But, that’s unfortunately not always possible.

Anonymous asked:

How does it feel to go from playing music constantly to just being a fan?

I still play music often, it’s just now more of a hobby than a budding career.

I love being only a fan of music now. I get to enjoy records for what they are versus if I played on them or if I could have played on them. For example, my friends in The American Scene released a phenomenal record last week called “Haze”. Being able to just listen to it as a fan has been great. That kind of thing is special and something I wasn’t able to do back in 2006.

But, it’s not without its tough moments. I miss performing, and I definitely miss the community of kids working hard to break through the ceiling. I’m able to kind of curb that feeling by supporting my friends (like The American Scene) and recording my own tunes (like my project, I Was Given Feet To Follow You) and performing occasionally.

All in all, it was a difficult transition but a necessary one. It’s been quite a ride and I’m glad I was able to keep driving through it all.